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20110701
20110731
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correspondent pamela constable, about her new book on pakistan's double game with the >> it's always sort of had this nuanced, subtle, denied unclear relationship with all these militant groups. but now it's all come back to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from vie
"bbc world news america." a year after devastating rains ravitch pakistan, we return to the hardest-hit region to see how people are coping in the aftermath. -- a year after devastating rains ravage pakistan. one country right and the heart of europe appears to be a new to the currency crisis. switzerland's fanc is riding high and has become a safe haven for investors. >> this is a landscape that has attracted tourists for over a century. this year, visitors are staying on the ground. those that are here are counting their pennies. as the euro slides, the swiss franc rises and rises. foreign tourists find switzerland too expensive. meanwhile, the swiss are neglecting their on resorts in favor of a cheap holiday abroad. >> i am watching the situation with enormous concern. things have gotten worse. jobs and businesses are really in danger now and that is bad for our economy. >> the swiss franc is at an all- time high against the euro. a new study shows that a thousand hotels across the alps are threatened with closure. >> there will be job cuts. there has already been. each of the ho
towards that group. >> interesting because in 2008, india blames elements within pakistan. do you think that there might be a coincidence in these attacks happening just months after the peace talks between india and pakistan started? >> it is inconceivable that india would have any role in this because india and pakistan are now engaged in a dialogue. the foreign ministers will be meeting shortly. pakistan is facing multiple threats. we have had an outbreak of sectarian violence. we know how involved they are. we have a pakistani taliban attack. we are at the point of a new low. the idea that pakistan would instigate a crisis with india at this point is inconceivable. >> what about indian intelligence gathering and security? there has been a number of cracks, particularly since 2008. is this any reflection on the indian authority's confidence? >> there will be questions about another attack in mumbai. after 2008, there were major reviews within india within -- about internal security. in this case, there would be a very close examination of how close that india has responded. they have
based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind them makes sure that india's city is still vulnerable. >> for more on today's violence, i spoke with the ambassador who formerly served as u.s. assistant secretary of state for south asian affairs. he is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. i started by asking who he thought could be behind the attacks. >> well, i know one thing, that mumbai, it is a very sad day for mumbai, the fourth attack in the last 10 years. this city has been attacked by terrorists on many occasions, and this is the latest episode. it does not appear to be the same nature of attack that occurred in november of 2008, the suicide bombers that attacked in mumbai, killing 166 people that were tied to the l.e.t., a pakistani-based militant group. this appears to be more sporadic. it does not appear to be the same kind of attack. india has seen these before by a group called north dakota and mehanna hedin. it is an indigenous group. they have done thes
to reintegrate in those areas. secondly, more broadly, put more pressure on pakistan, the biggest outside government supporter of the taliban. if they were to suddenly decide they wanted to cut a deal, that would put pressure on the taliban. unfortunately, we are not seeing across-the-board big three in all locations, nor we seeing pakistan put pressure on them -- a cross-led dashboard victory -- across-the-board- victory in all locations, nor are we seeing pakistan put pressure on them. we're seeing the taliban lose ground in the south. i suspect part of that is contesting areas that the taliban does -- >> thank you for coming in. the worst drought in decades is forcing thousands of families in east africa to walk for days to find refugee camps. the un says some very young children are dying before they ever get there. rain fell for the past three seasons. people are facing dire shortages of food, shelter, and health services. we are in a kenyan refugee camp, the largest of its kind in this world, for this story. >> day after day, mile after mile, they walked and walked. these are the pe
pakistan. -- she went on to vow that the obama administration will not ease pressure on neighboring pakistan. >> this used to be rare. now they are routine. both countries are determined to strengthen their strategic global partnership, defense and regional security or on the agenda. the agreed to work closer together in afghanistan as the u.s. agreed to pull out its troops. hillary clinton praised the recent resumption of talks between india and pakistan. >> we think this is the most promising approach to encourage both sides to build more confidence between them and work to implement the kinds of steps that will demonstrate the improved atmosphere that is so necessary for us to deal with the underlying problem of terrorism. >> she also said that terrorism was on everyone's minds following last week's bombing of mumbai which killed 20 people. the attack revealed once again the vulnerability of the indian cities and the police who are investigating. the security agencies should work closer together to prevent future attacks. the focus of the next page of the visit will be on busines
into jens, the best intelligence we've gotten since tora bora that he was in abbottabad pakistan, we acted yuan laal ratly and took h out and appropriately so. we do work through the united nations in a variety of places in order, like on the sanctions regimes, on iran and north korea. but we have, as i said at the outset, really undertake aggressively... you know, the first triple trip obama... president obama tk outside the united states was in april, 2009 was to europe for a set of sum rk teixeiras and then to turkey. and understanding that these rising powers, these relationships are important for problem solving, particularly in a place like the middle east. we have had disagreements with the turks over the last three years. >> rose: what are those disagreements? >> we had a disagreement with the turks over tactics around the iranian sanctions resolution. and they thought... >> rose: this is turkey and brazil together because of their response? >> yes. and we... >> rose: they thought they were doing your bidding, you understand that? >> i understand a lot about it. and... but, in fact
. and there is a problem that some governments are hostage to the religious leaders. pakistan is a good example. saudi arabia. >> iran is a much more intense example because we have the religious leaders within the government to have the control but take north africa i think some of the most enlightening kind of intellectual work being done happens in morocco, tune ease -- ton ease ya, algeria and egypt, or will you find it in indonesia or malaysia or in sub sahharan africa. so there is an internal muslim problem that muslims need to address by themselves. it's not going to lp if it is tainted by some european assistce. that's the inside problem but muslims are not paying sufficient attention to that and i doelieve that american muslims can play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we hav
in iraq after the withdrawal deadline in december. officials in pakistan today played down a u.s. decision to suspend $800 million in military aid. u.s. officials confirmed it on sunday. but, a pakistani spokesman insisted today that operations would continue without external support. tensions between the two nations have escalated since the u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden inside pakistan. reports in britain now say former prime minister gordon brown was one of the victims of phone hacking by a tabloid newspaper "news of the world". the rupert murdoch media conglomerate has closed the paper. and it delayed efforts today to take over another company, british sky broadcasting or, b- sky-b. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: gordon brown wooed the murdoch empire like the best of them. but they turned on him, backing david cameron in the last election. today, he turned on them. gordon brown believes his phone and that of his wife may have been hacked into by the "news of the world." he believes someone working on behalf of the "sunday times"
.s. raid into pakistan that led to the killing of osama bin laden. you also would do away with, in essence, the c.i.a. why did you oppose the raid and what would you put in the place of it? >> well, the question to me was i was just saying it could be done differently. i mean, all this does was raise questions and i predicted that this would lead to a lot of resentment and think of the chaos in pakistan and the mess that we have. we both bomb them and give them money and people hate their own government because their own government's a puppet of ours. my frustration with bin laden was it took so long. >> woodruff: and the c.i.a., you would.... >> couric: i don't think the c.i.a. should be a military arm of the government dropping bombs secretly. you can't even separate the two. you don't even know who is controlling the bombing of this country now. >> woodruff: a couple questions about your campaign. you have a son who was elected to the united states senate rand paul from the state of kentucky. this is your third try for president. there was some talk he was looking at running for preside
operations forces killed the world's most wanted man in a raid on a house in pakistan. the operation gave the world a glimpse into a vast and secret campaign being waged by the united states. it's known as the kill/capture program. >> all right, spot on 1-6-0. ( explosion ) >> was it good? >> roger, control. >> narrator: it's a campaign that the military says has killed or captured more than 12,000 militants in the last year. ( explosion ) using cutting-edge technology, elite teams are hunting down taliban and al qaeda leaders one by one, and taking them out. >> firing. missile away. >> missile's away. >> roger that. ( indistinct radio chatter ) >> we're getting so good at various electronic means of identifying, tracking, locating, members of the insurgency that we're able to employ this extraordinary machine, an almost industrial-scale counterterrorism killing machine that has been able to pick out and take off the battlefield not just the top-level, al qaeda- level insurgents, but also increasingly is being used to target mid-level insurgents. >> narrator: the kill/capture program is v
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put i
. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, security has been ramped up across the nation and the police now better trained and resourced than they were a few years ago, but there are no shortage of targets in a country of 1.2 billion. >> sreenivasan: mumbai is india's financial capital and home to its movie industry as well. u.s. stocks turned lower today after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke played down talk of new stimulus moves. he had said yesterday that the fed was ready to act, if the economy gets worse. today, he emphasized that he expects things to improve, albeit slowly. in response, the dow jones industrial average lost 54 points to close at 12,437. the
warned there would be harsh punishment for anyone found guilty of negligence in the sinking. in pakistan, intelligence officials reported u.s. drone aircraft, firing missiles, killed at least 42 suspected militants in less than 24 hours. four missile strikes targeted sites in tribal areas near the afghan border, beginning late monday night. u.s. and pakistani relations have been increasingly tense since the raid that killed osama bin laden. a u.s. army ranger was awarded the nation's highest military award, the medal of honor, today for heroism in afghanistan. during a fight in 2008, sergeant first class leroy petry was shot in both legs and lost his right hand when he tried to throw back an enemy grenade. his actions saved two other rangers. president obama presented the medal at a white house ceremony this afternoon. later, outside the white house, petry said all of the troops serving overseas are heroes. >> whenever you have a chance or opportunity to thank them, check them, give them a pat on the back for the job they've done because they've earned it. that's the british award any se
is in captivity. that's happened, for instance, in pakistan with a man named umar, a columnist, who was abducted and sexually assaulted. he was sodomized in retribution for his writing. >> warner: a lot of these victims at least the women, have never told their stories before to anyoee other than friends or family. why not? >> there are a number of reasons. the biggest one i heard from international correspondents was the fear of losing assignments. i have spoken to at least two journalists that told me that they were taken off assignments specifically because they came forward to talk about their sexual assault. so it really does happen. they don't want to be appear to be weak or vulnerable. women told me repeatedly that they had worked very hard to overcome this sense that they were the weaker gender in this profession and that them didn't feel that they could reveal that they had been raped without it making them look somehow more vulnerable.çç there are also.... >> warner: what about the local reporters? what were usually their reason for not saying anything? >> a lot of different cultura
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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